REMEMBERING NWAYEREUWA, NWANNEDIA, IKONNIA AND NWUGO.

 REMEMBERING NWAYEREUWA, NWANNEDIA, IKONNIA  AND NWUGO. 


I’m sure 90% of Africans, Nigerians and mainly people of Igbo origin who read the headline of this post will be like who the hell are these people? 


Yes we wouldn’t know them because we’ve been busy learning about their Mother Theresa and the fraudulent story of Mary Slessor. 

On this day 90yrs ago, in the morning of November 18th 1929, a man called Emereuwa upon the directive of his boss Okugo the warrant chief, walked into the compound of a widow called Nwanyereuwa, ordered her for a census of all her livestock and household. The widow Nwanyereuwa knowing the census will determined how much she will be taxed by the British colonial government, embittered, shouted on Emereuwa “was your widowed mother at home counted?” An angry exchange ensued. Nwanyereuwa resentfully rushed down to the town and market square, consulted other disgruntled women, They with palm fronds quickly mobilised other women. And that marked the beginning of one of the greatest resistance, rebellion and uprising the British imperial colonial rule ever faced in Nigeria general, Called  The Aba Women Riot” otherwise known as&nbssp;


While the men were subdued, while the man died in the men in the face of oppression and tyranny of colonialism. The women stepped up and in. Record has it that over ten thousand women were involved in this revolt, and about 50 women lost their lives in the war/riot. This resistance was orchestrated by ;

1) Persuasive Ikonnia

2) Intelligent Nwannedia

3) Passionate Nwugo 

4) Wise, Counselling and strategic Nwanyereuwa these were the women that led the Famous Aba Womens Riot. Women from across Six ethnic groups were involved, the Igbos, Ibibio, Andoni, Ogoni, Bonny and Opobo

Hundreds of British colonial courts were burnt down and destroyed, hundreds of warrant chiefs were ostracised and banished. On the aftermath of the revolt, the British were forced to abandon the proposed plans to impose tax on the market women, powers of the warrant chiefs were considerably curbed and more robust room was created for women’s inclusiveness in the grand scheme of things. 


The Aba women’s riot was on the scale never seen before. It prompted, encouraged and inspired subsequent agitations like;

1) The Tax protest of 1938

2) The Owerri and Calabar oil mill protest of the 1940s 

3) The Onitsha Aba Tax revolt of 1956

Then consequently the Nigeria independence in 1960. 


But unfortunately sad, when you drive through Aba today, you will see Faulks road, in owerri you will see Wetheral Road and Douglas road all of them are colonial relics. Imo state government house is called Douglas house, named after Harold Morday Douglas, a brutal British colonial district commissioner who orchestrated the Ahiara expedition of 1905 that saw villages wiped out. 


We witnessed one... governor of Imo State who was busy moulding status of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia  and Jacob Zuma of South Africa that has no connection or historical relevance to the people of Imo State. We’ve seen streets, roads, government buildings and and schools named after strangers, monuments raised for people of little or no importance to our history and future. But the real heroes, heroins and legends have been relegated to obscurity, sent to oblivion in a complete sheer and crass negligence. 

I hope that one day, the Igbos, Ibibios, Andonis, Ogonis, Opobos and Bonnis will have a leadership that will remember these women, the fifty that lost their lives and all that paid the ultimate price, immortalise them. I hope one day I shall see Nwanyereuwa road, Ikonnia hospital, Nwannedia secondary school and Nwugo shopping plaza. I hope to see us name our children after these legendary women and mothers and tell them the story. 


On every 27th August, let us remember the women who didn’t only fight against an oppressive British colonial rule, but also had to fight their own men (Warrant chiefs) who chose the side of the Oppressor because of crumbs that fall from the table of masser. 


Aba women’s riot, the women who went to war. We remember.


Written by Mazi chibuzo onyechwe


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EVERY IGBO BLOOD'S SHOULD READ AND SHARE EXTENSIVELY TO ALL IGBO BLOOD'S

 EVERY IGBO BLOOD'S SHOULD READ AND SHARE EXTENSIVELY TO ALL IGBO BLOOD'S


         BELOW


1. NSO NWANYI

In Igboland all women live apart from their husbands and neither cooks for them nor enters their husband’s quarters when she is in her period, she is seen as unclean. 

Even up till today such practice is still applicable in some parts of Igboland especially by the traditionalists. 


Before a woman can enter the palace of Obi of Onitsha , she will be asked if she is in her period, if yes, she will be asked to stay out.


Leviticus 15: 19-20

When a woman has her monthly period, she remains unclean, anyone who touches her or anything she has sat on becomes unclean.


2. ALA OBI

An Igbo man’s ancestral heritage, called “Ana Obi” is not sellable, elders will not permit this. If this is somehow done due to the influence of the West the person is considered a fool and is ostracized by the community.


1 King 21:3

I inherited this vineyard from my ancestors, and the lord forbid that I should sell it, said Naboth.


3. IKUCHI NWANYI

Igbos have practiced the taking of a late brothers wife into marriage after she had been widowed until the white men came. Now it is rarely done but except in very rural villages.


Deuteronomy 25:5

A widow of a dead man is not to be married outside the family; it is the duty of the dead man's brother to marry her.


4. IGBA ODIBO

In Igboland, there is a unique form of apprenticeship in which either a male family member or a community member will spend six(6) years (usually in their teens to their adulthood) working for another family. And on the seventh year, the head of the host household, who is usually the older man who brought the apprentice into his household, will establish (Igbo: idu) the apprentice

by either setting up a business for him or giving money or tools by which to make a living.


Exodus 21:2

If you buy a Hebrew slave, he shall serve you for six years. In the seventh year he is to be set free without having to pay you anything.


5. IRI JI

In Igboland , the yam is very important as it is their staple crop. There are celebrations such as the New yam festival (Igbo: Iri Ji) which are held for the harvesting of the yam. 


New Yam festival (Igbo: Iri ji) is celebrated annually to secure a good harvest of the staple crop. 


Those old days it is an abomination for one to eat a new harvest before the festival. It's a tradition that you give the gods of the land first as a Thanksgiving.


Deuteronomy 16:9

Count 7 weeks from the time that you begin to harvest the crops, and celebrate the harvest festival to honor the lord your God, by bringing him a freewill offering in proportion to the blessing he has given you. 


Celebrate in the lord's presence together with your children, servants, foreigners . Be sure that you obey my command, said the lord.


6. IBE UGWU

In Igboland it's a tradition that the male children are circumcised on the 8th day. This tradition is still practiced till date.



On the eighth day, the child shall be circumcised.


7. OMUGWO

In Igboland, there is a practice known as "ile omugwo ". After a woman has given birth to a child, a very close and experienced relative of her, in most cases her mother is required by tradition to come spend time with her and her husband. In which she is to do all the work of the wife, while the new mom’s only assignment will be to breastfeed the new baby. 


This goes on for a month or more. In the Igbo old tradition, at this time, the new mom lives apart from her husband, would not cook or enter his quarters.


fter a woman gives birth, she is ritually unclean as she is during her monthly period. It will be 33 days until she is ritually clean from the loss of blood; she is not to touch anything that is holy.


Our ancestors have long practiced these tradition ever before the white man set foot on our soil with their Christianity.    


Umu nne'm, Eziokwu Chukwu goziri ndi Igbo!


 Was it a mere coincidence that most Igbo tradition are biblical?


Anyi Bu Umu Chineke, Evidence of Jewish tradition,please Read and share,God bless you

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